Avoid a Yeast Infection This Summer

We think we can all agree that summer is the funnest season. Festivals, long days at the beach, swimming after work, and workouts outdoors instead of in a sweaty gym. We live in togs and activewear and our tiniest shorts but, unfortch, that also means that the likelihood that we will get a yeast infection, like our excitement levels, goes up.

 

Why is this?

 

Unfortunately, all the same reasons that we love summer means we need to take better care down there. Wet togs, sweaty bike shorts and day drinking are all contributing factors. 

 

We wrote recently about how to take care of yeast infections, naturally and cover all the basics of what they are and how they come about but we’re going to keep things summer-specific on this one. 

 

Summer 2021 is gonna be a hot girl summer, not an itchy girl summer. So let’s get into how we can prevent the itch and still have a ball.

 

YEASTS LOVE WET TOGS

 

Dark, damp, warm environments are a yeast's wet dream (sorry). It’s in this climate that yeasty bacterial strains such as candida thrive and multiply, sometimes to the point of disrupting your V’s happy balance. 

 

If you’re prone to infections - or it’s that time of the month (yeast infections are more common around your period) - we highly recommend taking a change of togs or clothes to the beach with you to change into after a swim, or make sure you dry off well by laying in the sun - with your SPF of course.

 

EMBRACE YOUR BIRTHDAY SUIT

 

Let your girl breathe! No one wants to be covered up all of the time. 

 

Letting your vagina breathe by sleeping in the nude, or wearing pjs without knickers, you’ll give her some time away from the somewhat stifling environment of tight elastane and cotton. This is an easy, yet important way to nurture your vaginal microbiome. 

 

Also, dear reader, please refrain from sleeping in the same undies you’ve worn all day - your V won’t appreciate that.

 

GET SWEATY BUT DON'T STAY SWEATY

 

The hot, damp vaginal environments created by having sweat sessions while wearing tight synthetic activewear are like a nightclub for the yeasts that cause vaginal itches and infections. They’ll have the time of their lives in there. 

 

So, in the summer months when you’re hitting the gym or going for a run, there are a load of options: opt for airier shorts and cotton undies, shower right away after your workout instead of heading straight to brunch, or, if space or time is tight, just change your underwear afterwards and do the big change at home. A good rule of thumb is: “I treat my V how I like to treat me”.

 

GET PROBIOTICS FOR YOUR V

Lactobacilli are the VIP microbes of the vaginal microbiome. 

They cleverly produce hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid that keep your vagina’s pH level nice and acidic, preventing the growth of harmful pathogens like yeasts and Candida. 


Sometimes things can get a little out of hand though, and your naturally occurring bacteria could do with a back up. Which is why we made Queen V. The premium probiotics in Queen V have been studied for all sorts of benefits, not in the least for their ability to reduce and prevent yeast infections like thrush and candida. Taken daily they’ll not only make your vagina jump for joy, they’ll also help your digestion, and keep you pooping on the regular. You’re welcome.

 

So, what do we do next?

 

  • Take a daily probiotic to be extra sure that you’re balancing out good bacteria with good ones. Queen V has bacterial strains that balance the microbiome and pH of the vagina.

  • Carry some clean knickers. We don’t mean, like, to work or anything but if you’re going swimming or hitting the gym, being able to change into some clean underpants can make all the difference between itchy and not itchy.

  • Go nude. Again, not at work, but in bed or at home keeping things bare gives your V a break from the grind.

 

Disclaimer: This blog post is for educational purposes only. It is not designed to diagnose, treat or cure. We are all unique. For your individual health concerns it is important to discuss these with a relevant health professional.